recede


recede
recede, retreat, retrograde, retract, back can all mean to move or seem to move in a direction that is exactly the opposite of ahead or forward.
Recede stresses marked and usually gradually increasing distance from a given point, line, or position, but it implies movement on the part of what recedes only when a fixed point of view is indicated or understood
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the tide is receding

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until the flood waters recede

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while I stood gazing, both the children gradually grew fainter to my view, receding, and still recedingLamb

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When the point of view is that of a traveler or the distance is in time rather than in space, the receding thing is stationary and the point of view changes. In such a case either a gradual disappearance (as from view or consciousness) or a change in perspective is implied
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he stood at the ship's stern watching the shore recede from view

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past events as they recede appear in truer proportions— L. P. Smith

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the possibility of certain ultimate solutions has rather receded than approached as the years went by— Krutch

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When used of persons and their ideas or attitudes, recede suggests departure from a fixed idea, or determined attitude, or a definite stand
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he was far too self-willed to recede from a position, especially as it would involve humiliation— Hardy

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Retreat implies withdrawal from a point or position reached, usually because of uncertainty, or of imminent defeat or danger, or in obedience to orders
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after the failure of the first attack, the army retreated

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he had retreated inside himself, as into a dense thicket— Hervey

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they frequently approached this theme, and always retreated from it— Meredith

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Retrograde implies movement contrary to what is expected, normal, or natural; thus, a planet retrogrades when it moves or seems to move from east to west, or in a direction opposite to that of the usual planetary course. The verb is also used to imply the reverse of progress in the course of development (as of an institution, a species, or an individual)
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some races have been stationary, or even have retrogradedLubbock

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in his Latin and Greek he was retrogradingMeredith

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we have no control over the process by which the arts or sciences advance or retrogradeWhitehead

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Occasionally it is used to imply a going backward in time or an inversion of the chronological order
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our narrative retrogrades to a period shortly previous to the incidents last mentioned— Scott

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Retract suggests a drawing backward or inward from a forward or exposed position, often in reference to those parts of an organism which can be thrust forward or drawn backward
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a cat retracting its claws

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throwing out and retracting their left fists like pawing horses— Shaw

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Back applies to any retrograde motion and is often qualified by an adverb (as up, out, or down)
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back an automobile

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the water in a drain backs up when a pipe cannot carry it off

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back out of a room

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a wind backs when it shifts to a counterclockwise direction

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Often when followed by out or down it implies a receding from a stand or attitude, or a retreating from a promise or an engagement
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he will never back down once his word is given

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he is trying to back out now that he sees how much work the project entails

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the opposition forced the governor to back down and to recall his recommendations

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Analogous words: withdraw, retire, depart (see GO): *rebound, recoil
Antonyms: proceed: advance (sense 2)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • recede — re‧cede [rɪˈsiːd] verb [intransitive] if prices, interest rates etc recede, they decrease: • Growth was expected to recede throughout the year. • The domestic market is receding. * * * recede UK US /rɪˈsiːd/ verb [I] ► to get lower in value,… …   Financial and business terms

  • Recede — Re*cede (r[ e]*s[=e]d ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Receded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Receding}.] [L. recedere, recessum; pref. re re + cedere to go, to go along: cf. F. rec[ e]der. See {Cede}.] 1. To move back; to retreat; to withdraw. [1913 Webster] Like… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Recede — Re*cede (r[=e]*s[=e]d ), v. t. [Pref. re + cede. Cf. {Recede}, v. i.] To cede back; to grant or yield again to a former possessor; as, to recede conquered territory. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • recede — recede1 [ri sēd′] vi. receded, receding [L recedere: see RE & CEDE] 1. to go or move back [the high water receded] 2. to withdraw (from) [to recede from a promise] 3. to slope backward …   English World dictionary

  • recede — index decrease, depart, diminish, ebb, erode, escheat, regress, retire (retreat) …   Law dictionary

  • recédé — recédé, ée (re sé dé, dée) part. passé de recéder …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • recede — (v.) late 15c., from M.Fr. receder, from L. recedere to go back, withdraw, from re back (see RE (Cf. re )) + cedere to go (see CEDE (Cf. cede)). Related: Receded; receding …   Etymology dictionary

  • recede — [v] withdraw; diminish abate, back, close, decline, decrease, depart, die off, diminish, drain away, draw back, drop, dwindle, ebb, fade, fall back, flow back, go away, go back, lessen, reduce, regress, retire, retract, retreat, retrocede,… …   New thesaurus

  • recede — ► VERB 1) move back or further away. 2) gradually diminish. 3) (of a man s hair) cease to grow at the temples and above the forehead. 4) (receding) (of a facial feature) sloping backwards. ORIGIN Latin recedere go back …   English terms dictionary

  • recede — [[t]rɪsi͟ːd[/t]] recedes, receding, receded 1) VERB If something recedes from you, it moves away. [V prep] Luke s footsteps receded into the night... As she receded he waved goodbye. [V ing] ...the receding lights of the car. 2) VERB When… …   English dictionary